Ingredients

How to make it

  • Dress and cut it up. Put in pot, then bring to boil. Break up spicewood branches and put in pot with meat. Boil until meat is tender. Remove; then salt and pepper; then roll in flour; put in 1/2 cup shortening, preferably bacon grease. Then put in oven and bake until it is brown.

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Reviews & Comments 13

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  • ccavan 6 years ago
    How about becoming a vegetarian?
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  • eeks 6 years ago
    How about a good rattlesnake recipe...here in florida, we have a good supply!
    Viper Casserole maybe?? snake scampi??
    Hmmmm....a whole new forum!!??
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  • achope246 7 years ago
    Groundhog?? Porcupine?? And I thought deer and squirrel were weird, lol!!
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  • bondc 7 years ago
    I've eaten groundhog, more or less this recipe (well, cooked the same way, though I don't know about the spicewood). It was pretty good (better than squirrel, which I don't like at all). Most states (maybe all) have open season on groundhogs.

    I've eaten lots of game, but then, I come from a family of hunters. Maybe I'll post my burgoo recipe.


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  • linebb956 7 years ago
    All you people are so much fun.... I love ya all!
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  • thepiggs 7 years ago
    Alaska,
    There IS a group for these recipes! It should be showing up in the new group area.

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  • jgpgarrett 7 years ago
    eeeuuuu!
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  • alaskanmom 7 years ago
    I'm thinking we need to start a group for recipes like this. Just told linebb956 that I have an Alaskan cookbook that has all sorts or "game" recipes. The one for porupine says to place the whole porcupine over an open fire & let it burn off all the hair & quills. Then you scrap away the quills/hair & charcoaled skin, then continue with the innerds! Sounds good huh? But if you've got a tasting for muskrat, mnt. sheep, caribou, or how about some Fried Beaver Tail! Let me know and I'd be happy to pass them on.
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  • helewes 7 years ago
    No offense, but I'd rather eat a old boot.
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  • chefjeb 7 years ago
    I have a recipe from the University of Georgia Extension Service for whistle Pig (groundhog) pie if anyone is interested. I dopn't plan on using it. The last time I checked groundhog wasn't a meat Kroger or the Piggly Wiggly stocked, but will be glad to lend the recipe. The recipe says use a young groundhog and soak the meat overnight in salt water to remove the gamey taste. And the traditional Appalachian side is ramps, if in season (a smelly black leek that grows wild and will make you stink for a week) or an onion and cornbread. If you make it , post a photo.
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  • linebb956 7 years ago
    One thing to do with them when they see their shadow! Too funny... My uncle hunts and eats BEAR... now that stinks!
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  • thepiggs 7 years ago
    I've seen enough of them as road kill so maybe I should stop and get one. It would last me for weeks!
    (They are much nicer eating grass in the park as I pass by...)

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  • zena824 7 years ago
    OMG..all we need is a pone of corn bread to sop up the juices with.... and a slice of onion...
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